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Northern Fine Scale

Manufacturer of precision Gauge  1 outdoor model railway rolling stock



Seven Plank Wagons

Northern Fine Scale Gauge 1 Seven Plank Wagons are modelled on those used in Britain as a large-size railway bulk carriers. Both the railway companies and private owners maintained large fleets. These wagons often carried the owner's name and functioned as widely seen and much repeated advertisements for the company.

Please note that all Northern Fine Scale Seven Plank Wagons kits are available with transfers (Decals) in the liveries of the "Big Four" British railway companies.



Abbott seven plank wagon

J.C. Abbott of Birmingham was a large company of coal factors who supplied quantities of coal to industrial users. Deliveries ranged from one wagon to whole trainloads.

They bought coal from the South Wales collieries as well as those in the Midlands and North, and had many contracts supplying gasworks and electricity generating stations.

Wagons both with and without coke rails would be seen throughout the country. Wagons would deliver coal to a customer and then return filled with coke.

The coke rail option is available with this wagon model.



Anderson seven plank wagon

Anderson & Company of Whitstable were coal factors who received their supplies by both rail and sea from the Yorkshire, Derbyshire and Nottingham coalfields.

They delivered wagon loads throughout the south east to coal merchants and industrial consumers. Their wagons would have been seen on the Southern, LNER, LMS systems, and occasionally on the GWR when bringing loads from South Wales collieries.

This model is of the side door loading pattern.



Bailey seven plank wagon

A.G. Bailey, were Kentish coal merchants, based in Ashford with depots at the Charing, Smeeth, and Folkstone Junction stations.

Their wagons would be seen throughout the south-east as well as in trains to and from the Nottingham and South Wales coalfields where they obtained most of their coal.

This model is of the side door loading pattern.



Birley seven plank wagon

Birley Colliery was owned by the Sheffield Coal Company, and straddled the Yorkshire -- Derbyshire border from whence came some of the finest gas coal in the country.

The product was in great demand and Birley wagons were seen all over the country reaching as far south as London in the east, and Cardiff in the west. Coke rails were used to convert the wagons for carrying coke.

Wagons were generally painted black although some were finished in grey. The corners of Birley wagons were always painted white giving a striking effect.

The coke rail option is available with this wagon model.



Birmingham seven plank wagon

The City of Birmingham Gas Department was, in 1939, the single largest utility in the country, owning five gasworks and over 2,100 wagons.

Their annual coal demand was over a million tons. Most of the coal came from the coalfields of Nottingham, Staffordshire, Derbyshire and Yorkshire.

Coke produced in the municipal gasworks was delivered throughout the country in wagons fitted with removable coke rails.

The coke rail option is available with this wagon model.



Bolsover seven plank wagon

The Bolsover Colliery Company had a very large fleet of wagons supplying the domestic market as well as steamship companies and the export market.

Consequently their wagons would have been seen throughout the country, often marshalled in multiples in trains.

This model is of the side door and end door loading pattern.



G. Bryer Ash seven plank wagon

A large company of coal merchants founded circa 1907, G. Bryer Ash had eleven depots by 1927, ranging from Exeter to Bristol, east to Basingstoke, and south to Portsmouth.

The company served much of the south and south-west of England. Supplying the domestic trade, as well as industrial clients such as gasworks, they also delivered coal from the Hatfield Main Colliery near Doncaster to the Huntley and Palmer biscuit factory at Reading.

This model is of the side door and end door loading pattern.



Charringtons seven plank wagon

A prominent London company of coal merchants, Charringtons (not the brewery) had sixteen depots in London and an additional thirty in Middlesex and Surrey.

Between 1922 and 1930 the bought 1,150 wagons from several builder. Their equipment would have been seen throughout much of the country.



Coalite seven plank wagon

Coalite produced their smokeless fuel at Darton in the middle of the Yorkshire coalfields and delivered it throughout the United Kingdom in their distinctively liveried wagons.

The coke rail option is available with this wagon model.



Cornwall seven plank wagon

(Edwin) E.A. Cornwall was a London coal dealer with depots around the capital in such places as Brixton, West Kensington and Finchley Road and served both residential and commercial customers.

Obtaining their coal from South Wales and the North one could expect to see these colourful wagons in all regions.

This model is of the side door and end door loading pattern.



Cortaulds seven plank wagon

Samuel Courtaulds & Company was founded in the early 1800s and by the turn of the century had become a major player in the textile and chemical industries.

There is little information about their wagons but you can be sure that it was a substantial fleet since their use of coal at their different plants around the country would have been considerable.

A. G. Thomas saw and recorded No. 18 painted green with white lettering, and we can only speculate that other wagons may have been red oxide, grey, or black.

This model is of the side door and end door loading pattern.



Flower and Sons Brewery seven plank wagon

Flower & Sons Brewery of Stratford-on-Avon was one of the few breweries to have owned their own open wagons.

They bought their first in 1913 and their last, No. 9, in 1937. Because Welsh anthracite was their coal of choice, their wagons would only have been seen on the GWR.

It is unlikely that wagons would have been used for any beer deliveries, though one can never say 'never.'

This model is of the side door loading pattern.



Great Mountain seven plank wagon

Great Mountain Colliery information is limited, but this Glamorganshire colliery would have produced high quality coal much demand in the domestic and industrial markets.

Their wagons were registered with the GWR and it is fair to assume they would have been seen as far away as London and the Home Counties, and also in the Midlands.

This model is of the side door and end door loading pattern.



Manvers seven plank wagon

Manvers Main had three coalmines in the Rotherham area producing 1 million tons of high quality coal a year by the 1930s, all of it moved by rail.

They owned well over 1,000 wagons which would have been seen on the lines of all the Big Four throughout the country.

This model is of the side door and end door loading pattern.



Micklefield seven plank wagon

Micklefield Coal & Lime Company owned the Peckfield Colliery at Micklefield and produced gas, house, and steam coal.

Much of their coal was exported through the docks at Hull and Goole, but their wagons were seen as far south as London.

They owned several hundred wagons that travelled widely and the recorded numbers we know of were 200-299 and 400-599.

This model is of the side door and end door loading pattern.



Moy seven plank wagon

Coal factors Thomas Moy of Colchester had depots in London, Norfolk and Suffolk as well as Essex.

Their wagons would have been seen all over the eastern side of the country as far north as Yorkshire from where they obtained some of their coal.

They operated their wagons with removable coke rails.

The coke rail option is available with this wagon model.



Primrose seven plank wagon

The Primrose Colliery Company owned several pits in the Swansea valley, and their wagons would have travelled widely from Liverpool and Manchester in the North to London and the Home Counties in the East.

The Primrose Colliery was situated near the Welsh village of Rhos, between Pontardawe and Neath. The area produced very high quality anthracite in abundance.

In 1908, Pantyffynnon Station opened, creating a junction of the LNWR linking Llandeilo/Pontardulais, and the Amman Valley GWR line to Brynamman.

This model is of the side door and end door loading pattern.



Pugh seven plank wagon

R. Pugh & Company was a London coal merchant with depots at Chelsea Basin and Gospel Oak.

They owned about 40 wagons and had a Royal Warrant from King Edward VII (1901-1910) and obtained coal (it can be assumed best quality) from the Derbyshire coalfields.

As Royal Warrant holders they would have supplied Buckingham Palace and their wagons would have been used to supply Windsor Castle and also the Sandringham Estate in Norfolk.

This model is of the side door loading pattern

.

Ricketts seven plank wagon

Rickett Cockerell and Company, or Ricketts as they would be known (much the same way that F. W. Woolworth were always known as Woolworths), were the largest suppliers of house coal in London and the Home Counties.

With 4,500 wagons supplying 180 depots in that area they would have been a common sight and with the Company obtaining their coal from the North, the Midlands and Wales wagons would have been seen on the lines of all the Big Four railway companies.

This model is of the side door and end door loading pattern.



S.C. seven plank wagon

Stephenson Clarke and Associated Companies. Ltd was the largest distributors of coal in the UK with a fleet of over 10,000 coal and coke wagons.

The company had contacts to supply, amongst others, the Admiralty and the Southern Railway, plus power stations and major shipping fleets, so these colourful wagons would have been seen in profusion throughout the country.

This model is of the side door and end door loading pattern.



Spiers seven plank wagon

Wallace Spiers was a large London coal merchant who supplied both residential and commercial customers.

Buying much coal from the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire collieries, the distinctive yellow wagons would have been seen mostly on the LMS between London and the North, and throughout the Home Counties.

This model is of the side door and end door loading pattern.


Stabler seven plank wagon

Arthur Stabler was a coal distributor with a fleet of several hundred wagons that supplied coal and coke to major companies in the Industrial North.

Coke was obtained mostly from Staveley's coke ovens in Derbyshire.

Seven plank wagons would have been seen both with and without coke rails until Stablers ceased trading around 1933.

The coke rail option is available with this wagon model.



The Staveley Coal and Iron Company established in the mid-1800's in Derbyshire, was a large enterprise.

Apart from owning nine collieries, it also held chemical works, blast furnaces and coke ovens.

They used their wagons to advertise their products and employed them for shipping coal, and for the delivery of finished products.

Wagons would range far and wide throughout the country. We have three different decal sets for Staveley.

These models are of the side door loading pattern.

Stavely Bleaching Powder seven plank wagon Stavely Metal Spun Pipes seven plank wagon Stavely Caustic Soda seven plank wagon

Ward seven plank wagon

T. W. Ward Ltd of Sheffield had private sidings at different locations as far south as Essex as well as throughout the Midlands and Yorkshire.

They were dealers in coal, coke and also scrap metal. Their large fleet of wagons would have been seen over a large part of the country both with and without coke rails.

The coke rail option is available with this wagon model.



Whitaker  seven plank wagon

B. Whitaker and Sons were quarry owners and brickmakers who would have used substantial quantities of coal for their kilns.

It is unlikely that their wagons were used to deliver bricks, and the 50 wagons bought in 1922 would have been seen mainly in the North and the Midlands.

This model is of the side door loading pattern.




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